On the Road

A Future to Believe In

Hillary Clinton and the news media are talking like the Democratic Party presidential nomination contest is over and done with. They’re wrong. There are 931 pledged delegates still at stake in contests this weekend in Puerto Rico and the Virgin Islands, next Tuesday in California and five other states and on June 14 in Washington, D.C. The truth is that at the end of a long and closely-fought contest, neither candidate is likely to have enough pledged delegates to cinch the nomination before the Democratic National Convention this summer. Whatever the outcome, one thing is certain. Voters all across the United States deserve to have a say in who the party nominates and what the party stands for. And no candidate should be allowed to short-circuit the democratic process.

Sanders, who has edged ahead of Clinton in the most recent Los Angeles Times poll of California voters, thinks voters in the Golden State and the other places still to hold contests are as important as the Iowa caucuses and New Hampshire primary.

“I am running for president because I want to give people a real choice in this election,” Sanders said at a Los Angeles news conference on Saturday. “I want to give people a choice to vote for something, future that calls for a government that represents all of us, not the 1 percent.”